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The inverted face inversion effect in prosopagnosia: evidence for mandatory, face-specific perceptual mechanisms.

Journal Article
Martha J. Farah, Kevin D. Wilson, H. Maxwell Drain, James R. Tanaka
Farah, M.J., Wilson, K.D., Drain, H.M, & Tanaka, J.R. (1995). The inverted face inversion effect in prosopagnosia: evidence for mandatory, face-specific perceptual mechanisms. Vision Research, 35, 2089-2093.

Does the human visual system contain a specialized system for face recognition, not used for the recognition of other objects? This question was addressed using the “face inversion effect” which refers to the loss of our normal proficiency at face perception when faces are inverted. We found that a prosopagnosic subject paradoxically performed better at matching inverted faces than upright faces, the opposite of the normal “face inversion effect”. The fact that his impairment was most pronounced with the stimuli for which normal subjects show the greatest proficiency in face perception provides evidence of a neurologically localized module for upright face recognition in humans. An additional implication of these data is that specialized systems may control behavior even when they are malfunctioning and therefore maladeaptive, consistent with the mandatory operation of such systems according to the “modularity” hypothesis of the cognitive architecture.

What is “special” about face perception?

Journal Article
Martha J. Farah, Kevin D. WIlson, H. Maxwell Drain, James R. Tanaka
Farah, M.J., Wilson K.D., Drain H.M., & Tanaka, J.R. (1998). What is “special” about face perception? Psychological Review, 105, 482-498.

There is growing evidence that face recognition is “special” but less certainty concerning the way in which it is special. The authors review and compare previous proposals and their own more recent hypothesis, that faces are recognized “holistically” (i.e., using relatively less part decomposition than other types of objects). This hypothesis, which can account for a variety of data from experiments on face memory, was tested with 4 new experiments on face perception. A selective attention paradigm and a masking paradigm were used to compare the perception effaces with the perception of inverted faces, words, and houses. Evidence was found of relatively less part-based shape representation for faces. The literatures on machine vision and single unit recording in monkey temporal cortex are also reviewed for converging evidence on face representation. The neuropsychological literature is reviewed for evidence on the question of whether face representation differs in degree or kind from the representation of other types of objects.

Issues surrounding the cognitive neuroscience of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Journal Article
Kevin D. WIlson
Wilson, K.D. (1998). Issues surrounding the cognitive neuroscience of obsessive-compulsive disorder. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 5, 161-172

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been studied extensively in recent years, with increased emphasis on understanding OCD’s biological substrates. There has been significant progress in documenting abnormal brain function in OCD patients, particularly in the orbitofrontal cortex, basal ganglia, and thalamus. Similar progress has broadened our understanding of the cognitive and behavioral manifestations of the disorder, including deficits in set shifting, hyperattention,and visuospatial construction abilities. Unfortunately, these results have not been replicated consistently.This report comprises a review of previous attempts to characterize the neurobiology and neuropsychology of OCD, and a discussion of several factors in OCD research that can help to explain previous inconsistencies.

When does the visual system use viewpoint-invariant representations during recognition?

Journal Article
Kevin D. Wilson, Martha J. Farah
Wilson, K.D. & Farah, M.J. (2003). When does the visual system use viewpoint-invariant representations during recognition? Cognitive Brain Research, 16, 399-415.

One popular model of object recognition claims that the visual system typically describes objects using view-specific representations, but that viewpoint-invariant representations are used when objects can be specified uniquely by the arrangement of parts along a single dimension. In a series of three naming experiments using novel, two-dimensional line drawings, we test this hypothesis against alternative accounts of when viewpoint-invariant representations are used during the recognition of upright and viewplane-rotated objects. Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrate that the number of dimensions along which featural information must be represented is the only stimulus feature that influences the type of representation used, consistent with the Tarr and Pinker model. Experiment 3, however, reveals that the use of viewpoint-invariant representations during recognition is not driven purely by stimulus features, and is at least partly under voluntary control. These data suggest that viewpoint-invariant representations are not automatically invoked by the visual system when the requisite stimulus features are present. Rather, our results suggest that top-down control processes, as well as bottom-up stimulus features, jointly determine the conditions under which the visual system uses viewpoint-invariant representations during visual recognition.

Control networks and hemispheric asymmetries in parietal cortex during attentional orienting in different spatial reference frames.

Journal Article
Kevin D. Wilson, Marty G. Woldorff, George R. Mangun
Wilson, K.D., Woldorff, M.G., & Mangun, G.R. (2005). Control networks and hemispheric asymmetries in parietal cortex during attentional orienting in different spatial reference frames. Neuroimage, 25, 668-683.

Neuropsychological research has consistently demonstrated that spatial attention can be anchored in one of several coordinate systems, including those defined with respect to an observer (viewer-centered), to the gravitational vector (environment-centered), or to individual objects (object-centered). In the present study, we used hemodynamic correlates of brain function to investigate the neural systems that mediate attentional control in two competing reference frames. Healthy volunteers were cued to locations defined in either viewer-centered or object-centered space to discriminate the shape of visual targets subsequently presented at the cued locations. Brain responses to attention-directing cues were quantified using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging. A fronto-parietal control network was activated by attention-directing cues in both reference frames. Voluntary shifts of attention produced increased neural activity bilaterally in several cortical regions including the intraparietal sulcus, anterior cingulate cortex, and the frontal eye fields. Of special interest was the observation of hemispheric asymmetries in parietal cortex; there was significantly greater activity in left parietal cortex than in the right, but this asymmetry was more pronounced for object-centered shifts of attention, relative to viewer-centered shifts of attention. Measures of behavioral performance did not differ significantly between the two reference frames. We conclude that a largely overlapping, bilateral, cortical network mediates our ability to orient spatial attention in multiple coordinate systems, and that the left intraparietal sulcus plays an additional role for orienting in object-centered space. These results provide neuroimaging support for related claims based on findings of deficits in object-based orienting in patients with left parietal lesions.

Implementing an undergraduate laboratory course in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Journal Article
Kevin D. Wilson
Wilson, K.D. (2006). Implementing an undergraduate laboratory course in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Teaching of Psychology, 33, 268-271.

This article describes the feasibility of implementing a functional

magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) laboratory course at an undergraduate-

focused institution without internal scanning facilities.

I discuss how to incorporate specific functional brain imaging

topics into lectures, how to design and implement laboratory sessions

that allow students to analyze existing fMRI data sets, and

how to incorporate empirical research projects involving novel

fMRI data collection into the course through collaborations with

researchers at larger institutions. This type of course is possible at

virtually any institution and provides an excellent opportunity for

advanced undergraduate students to gain first-hand research experience

in cognitive neuroscience.

Distinct patterns of viewpoint-dependent BOLD activity during common object recognition and mental rotation.

Journal Article
Kevin D. Wilson, Martha J. Farah
Wilson, K.D. & Farah, M.J. (2006). Distinct patterns of viewpoint-dependent BOLD activity during common object recognition and mental rotation. Perception, 35, 1351-1366.

A fundamental but unanswered question about the human visual system concerns the way in which misoriented objects are recognized. One hypothesis maintains that representations of incoming stimuli are transformed via parietally based spatial normalization mechanisms (eg mental rotation) to match view-specific representations in long-term memory. Using fMRI, we tested this hypothesis by directly comparing patterns of brain activity evoked during classic mental rotation and misoriented object recognition involving everyday objects. BOLD activity increased systematically with stimulus rotation within the ventral visual stream during object recognition and within the dorsal visual stream during mental rotation. More specifically, viewpoint-dependent activity was significantly greater in the right superior parietal lobule during mental rotation than during object recognition. In contrast, viewpoint-dependent activity was significantly greater in the right fusiform gyrus during object recognition than during mental rotation. In addition to these differences in viewpoint-dependent activity, object recognition and mental rotation produced distinct patterns of brain activity, independent of stimulus rotation: object recognition resulted in greater overall activity within ventral stream visual areas and mental rotation resulted in greater overall activity within dorsal stream visual areas. The present results are inconsistent with the hypothesis that misoriented object recognition is mediated by structures within the parietal lobe that are known to be involved in mental rotation.

Letters, not words, are processed holistically

Journal Article
Kevin D. Wilson, James M. Taylor
Wilson, K.D. and Taylor, J.M. (2009). Letters, not words, are processed holistically. Perception, 38, 1572-1574.

Observers cannot accurately discriminate the top halves of two sequentially presented three-letter words. One interpretation of this effect is that words, like faces, are processed holistically. Here we show, in three simple experiments, that this phenomenon is more consistent with the hypothesis that letters, not words, are processed holistically.

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